How to Write a Comic Book

How to Write a Comic Book

Posted by Comix Well Spring Staff on 21st Mar 2019

Are you looking to write your first comic book? Maybe you have an idea that you’ve been bouncing around in your head but haven’t figured out how to get started. Well, look no further because we have put together a guide below on some helpful steps to get your book from start to finish.

Step 1: Make an Outline

When writing anything, including a comic book script, the outline is arguably the most crucial part. Be sure to define a clear start to your story, middle with character development, and definitive ending. To get a basic idea of how to layout your outline see this article from makingcomics.com here.

It can be helpful to actually visualize this in the form of emotion graphs as well. You can learn more about those here.

Step 2: Decide which format you plan to use

It’s very important to settle on a format for your comic early on. You will need to decide on one of the standard comic forms or a variation of one as it will help drive the dialogue and flow of the story. Check out some common formats from this Wikipedia article here.

Step 3: Write the story - ignore layout

Begin writing the script following your outline created from above. Don’t stress or worry if you deviate slightly from your outline. It is important to stick closely to the outline though as to be sure that your story has the proper start, middle, and finish.

It can be helpful to think about the filming of a movie or TV show. You can’t start filming until the story has been fully written and edited. So, don’t get caught up along the way of what the visuals will look like, you can get there later once the script is set.

Step 4: Write multiple drafts - allow for changes and let them happen

A story is never perfect after the first draft! Take a break and come back after you’ve finished your first script and read through it end to end taking notes along the way. You’ll begin to find places where you can edit and write new drafts.

Be patient with this process, it takes time and there is no need to rush. You are putting a lot of work into this make sure it’s perfect. Keep your eye on the finish line! Also, do not be afraid to ask for help and have others read your draft for edits. It can be incredibly helpful to have a second, third, or even an eighth pair of eyes on your story. As our customer Andrew G. says when editing an anthology comic he had “contributions from eight different artists” on the project.

Looking for some inspiration? Check out our Customer Gallery with over 300 pictures and videos of our customer's comics.